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Oolong Tea

Oolong (sometimes pronounced 'wulóng') is a traditional Chinese tea ranging from 10% to 70% oxidation -- between green and black tea.

In Chinese tea culture, semi-oxidized oolong teas are collectively grouped as qingcha, literally: blue-green tea. It has a taste more akin to green tea than to black tea: it lacks the rosy, sweet aroma of black tea but it does not have the stridently grassy vegetal notes that typify green tea.

The best Oolong has a nuanced flavor profile. Oolong tea leaves are often processed and rolled into long curly leaves or into ball-like form similar to gunpowder tea. It is commonly served in Chinese restaurants, to accompany dim sum and other Chinese food.

Brewing Instructions:

Generally about 1 teaspoon of Oolong per cup should be used. Oolong should be prepared with 180°F (82°C) water and steeped 3-4 minutes. If you use more teaspoon per cup, then the infusion time is lessoned, however you can get more infusions per batch of leafs.

History:

The word oolong means "black dragon" in Chinese; various legends describe the origin of this curious name. In one legend, the owner of a tea plantation was scared away from his drying tea leaves by the appearance of a black serpent; when he cautiously returned several days later, the leaves had been oxidized by the sun and gave a delightful brew.

Another tale tells of a man named Wu Liang (later corrupted to Wu Long, or Oolong) who discovered oolong tea by accident when he was distracted by a deer after a hard day's tea-picking, and by the time he remembered about the tea it had already started to oxidise.

Others say that the tea is called "oolong" because the leaves look like little black dragons that wake when hot water is poured on them.

Health Benefits:

Teas contain a number of ingredients that have an influence on the human body. The quantities and percentages of these ingredients differ somewhat depending on the extent of oxidation.

As can be seen from the table below, green tea contains a wealth of one ingredient called catechin while black tea contains a lot of theaflavin. Oolong tea contains a large quantity of polyphenol. According to research, it has become clear that polyphenol is the ingredient that generates the delicious flavor unique to oolong tea and also promotes beauty and health.

Green Tea
Unoxidized
Oolong Tea
Semi Oxidized
Black Tea
oxidized
Caffeine ★★ ★★★ ★★★
Tannin ★★★★ ★★★★ ★★★★
Catechin ★★★★ ★★
Polyphenol ★★★★ ★★★
Teaflavin Tearubigin ★★ ★★★★
Sort 17 Items:
Thumbnail of Shangri-La Oolong | Organic
This premium loose leaf oolong tea offers a baked, biscuit-y aroma with high notes of pepper. The full-bodied brew features smooth woodland flavors, with a touch of caramel, malt, and a subtle hint of verdant green qualities.
Thumbnail of Bamboo Mountain Oolong
Offering a full, sweet, floral fragrance in the classic Taiwan green oolong style, this tea hails from the Zhushan region, or “Bamboo Mountain.” Low oxidation and light roasting contribute to the bright, floral fragrance and sweet, crisp body. A lighter brew than the more roasted oolongs, but with an equally long finish and multi-layered character.
Thumbnail of Blue Oasis
Brewed to an oceanic color using Thai pea flower, this tea is a blend oolong and white teas of fruity, delicate notes that are sure to teleport you straight to a sandy beach.
$4.00 Blue Oasis
Thumbnail of Maple Oolong
If you are missing the maple tree groves of Vermont or Canada, then this is the tea for you. Smells like morning breakfast, tastes like it is fresh off the tree! When brewed in the cup, this tea smells of hot maple syrup but the taste is not overly sweet, just the right amount of spice and flavor to not need any additions. The dried, blended leaves bring out the rich aroma of a toasty cabin during the cold winter holiday season.
$4.00 Maple Oolong
Thumbnail of Siberian Forest
The toasty Da Hong Pao oolong combined with a cooked black puerh is evened out with hot and cooling spices. Great for those late nights staying up reading old Slavic fairy tales and keeping Baba Yaga at bay!
Thumbnail of Coconut Oolong | Organic
Combines floral and delicately sweet Bao Zhong (Pouchong) oolong with real juicy pineapple and creamy coconut. All the flavors blend together so well, it's almost like the tea is grown next to a coconut grove. (Though it's not!)
Thumbnail of Milk Oolong
This tea is similar to Tie Guan Yin in its fresh green taste but cultivated to produce an aroma similar to milk. This aroma is enhance by milk flavoring resulting a rich, buttery tea. There is also slightly less caffeine with this tea than Tie Guan Yin as our Milk Oolong contains some of the stems as well as the leaves.
$5.50 Milk Oolong
Thumbnail of Da Hong Pao | Organic
With a nutty, roasted, flavor and sweet undertones, this oolong is a cut above our Wuyi Rock oolong, being the most intense oolong we carry. This is not surprising given the name translation of Da Hong Pao - Big Red Robe. This tea is grown in the WuYi Mountains of the Fujian Province, where the warm moisture and high elevation is perfect for producing this delightful Oolong.
Thumbnail of Jasmine Orchard Oolong
A bright blend of oolong and green tea balanced with fruits from the orchard and complemented with floral notes. Makes spring come alive in your cup!
Thumbnail of Plum Oolong
The natural plum flavor complements the Wuyi Mountain dark oolong that this tea is made with. Coming together to produce a nutty, roasted flavor with sweet plum overtones.
$4.00 Plum Oolong
Thumbnail of Prickly Pear Oolong
Indulge in an oolong tea with the flavors of ripe prickly pear fruit: tart and earthy melon with a slight spiced edge.
Thumbnail of Watermelon Oolong
This is a very refreshing green oolong blend with strong overtones of watermelon. Great as an iced tea or hot. Try cold steeping over night to bring out an even more intense flavor.
Thumbnail of Ginseng Oolong
Lightly oxidized Fujian oolong coated with famous Chinese ginseng powder. Energizing and sweetened with licorice powder, this is a pleasant tea anytime of day or night.
Thumbnail of Tie Guan Yin
Tie Guan Yin is sweet and thick with a hint of orchid aftertaste. The look of this brew is a subtle yellowish-green, and the first steeping unfurls the rolled tea leaf to reveal large, juicy green leaves. It tastes much like its aroma: Bright and incredibly fresh, with sweet, mellow grassy undertones. This oolong holds up to a surprising number of re-steepings, rewarding the palette with various incarnations of sweet, smooth, tangy, and lively flavors.
$5.00 Tie Guan Yin
Thumbnail of White Tip Oolong
Smooth and slightly sweet; toasty with a touch of dryness.

Oolong means semi oxidized. After rolling, the tea is allowed to ferment only until the edges of the leaves start to turn brown. The tea is then fired which arrests the oxidizing process and captures the interesting character associated with Oolong tea.

Thumbnail of Wuyi Rock | Organic
With a nutty, roasted, flavor and sweet undertones, this WuYi makes a wonderful iced tea, perfect for the summer.This tea is grown in the WuYi Mountains of the Fujian Province, where the warm moisture and high elevation is perfect for producing this delightful Oolong.

If you've heard WuYi tea in reference to weight loss, that's because it is packed with powerful antioxidants and polyphenols, which some believe promote healthy weight loss.

Thumbnail of Orange Blossom Oolong
The orange citrus taste combines spectacularly with the earthy oolong. A natural tasting brisk oolong thats great as an afternoon tea.