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Pure Black Tea

Black tea undergoes a more extensive oxidation process than its counterparts like green, oolong, or white teas. This oxidation imparts to it a robust flavor profile, complemented by a darker hue, often leading the Chinese to describe its liquid as red. Distinctly, in Chinese traditions, 'black tea' is reserved for post-fermented varieties like Pu-erh. Yet, in Western connotations, the title 'black tea' is more akin to what we recognize, distinguishing it from the 'red tea' of South Africa, known as rooibos.

Brewing Instructions:

Use about a teaspoon of leaves per cup. Boil the water and let the tea steep for 5 minutes. If you plan on adding milk or lemon, consider steeping for another minute to fortify its essence.

History:

Black tea's enduring aroma and taste have solidified its global trade value for centuries. Its preservable nature made it a currency in regions like Mongolia, Tibet, and Siberia up to the 19th century. Beyond commerce, it played a cultural role in ancient China, doubling as a dye for cloth, a mark that was seen as better than plain cloth. The British also significantly impacted the world of black tea by cultivating and promoting its growth in regions like Assam and Darjeeling, further diversifying the black tea portfolio.

Possible Health Benefits:

Black tea's merits aren't just in taste. Studies suggest its potential to reverse endothelial vasomotor dysfunction in coronary artery disease patients, offering insights into its cardiovascular protective attributes. However, adding milk might mitigate these benefits, as per some findings.

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Thumbnail of New Vithanakande Ceylon

Graded STGFOP (Special Tippy Golden Flowery Orange Pekoe), this tea has the highest proportion of tips. The "special" means it also uses the highest quality leaves in that classification.

Thumbnail of English Breakfast | Organic
Whole leaf black tea. A sweet and fruity blend of Indian, Ceylon, and Chinese teas. With a light body this tea is substantial enough to add milk and sugar; however, it can also be enjoyed without adding anything.
Thumbnail of Irish Breakfast | Organic
This orange pekoe Irish Breakfast is made from a blend of Indian and Chinese teas. Unlike many lesser Irish Breakfasts, our blend has whole leaves and includes golden tips. Sweet aroma with a brisk aftertaste, this tea really shines with milk and sugar.
Thumbnail of Grand Keemun | Organic
Keemun is a distinctive tea: deep yet not heavy and bright but not astringent. Notes of cocoa, toast, and sweet earth give way to a ripe, plum-like middle with hints of orchid and a twist of smoke.
Thumbnail of Monk's Blend | Organic
This combination of various subtle flavors makes a unique blend of robust black teas. With a slight vegetal aroma, this tea can be combined with milk, or enjoyed on its own. Monk's Blend is often drunk before, after, or as a break from long periods of meditation to refresh the senses.
Thumbnail of Russian Caravan | Organic
A classic black tea smoked over a fire and made with a blend of Keemun, Lapsang, Yunnan and Assam teas. This tea is not for everyone, but those who have found a love for it will accept no substitute. It is also lower in caffeine then other black teas.
Thumbnail of Scottish Breakfast
This tea is like a proper Highlander, robust, malty (not unlike a good Scotch) and full of life and vigor. Highlanders liked their tea very strong and insisted on hints of cask oak to remind them of their clan's own special elixir, single malt Scotch. Our Scottish breakfast has some CTC grade tea, this allows the tea to brew strong and quickly. Look for the small pellets in the picture. This tea is dry compared to an 'English breakfast' and is absent of the sweetness. Best when served with milk and sugar.
Thumbnail of Canadian Breakfast | Organic
A superb fresh morning tea. Malty notes from the Assam, flower-like hints from the Kenya with delicate wisps of oiliness from Anhui. This tea has been specifically blended to be used with a variety of water types, and conditions.
Thumbnail of Lapsang Souchong | Organic
Lapsang souchong is a black tea originally from the Mount Wuyi area in the Fujian province of China. The tea leaves have been withered over pine or cedar fires, pan-fired, rolled and oxidized before being fully dried in bamboo baskets over burning pine. The result is a smoky, robust tea with an overriding scent and flavor of wood smoke, which dominates the flavor of the black tea itself.
Thumbnail of Kenyan Lelsa
Kenyan black tea is rich and smooth. Often it is used as a filler for other more expensive teas. However this one is specifically made to be drunk by itself.
$3.25 Kenyan Lelsa
Thumbnail of Royal Yunnan | Organic
Excellent fullness with subtle China sweetness. Only produced during March and April, when the mountain air is moist and cool.
Thumbnail of First Flush Darjeeling | Organic
First Flush means that this tea was picked in March. It has a light vegetal taste that all first flush Darjeelings share. A tea for all occasions, though typically enjoyed without cream or sugar.
Thumbnail of Assam Breakfast | Organic
A new, classic Assam blend from multiple estate teas with a traditional leaf style. Produced during June this tea embodies all the flavor and strength you expect from a top Assam estate. This is a great breakfast tea that is best drunk with milk or even cream.

Note: This tea is no longer Golden Assam, as there are no golden tips in this tea blend.

Thumbnail of Darjeeling Second Flush
Plucked in the early summer months of May and June, this stylishly rolled leaf is made from select shoots that draw their succulence from the late spring showers. The cup is clear amber, yet full bodied with an excellent flowery nose. The flavor of the tea is mature in comparison to the First Flush. In taste it has a complex layer of maltiness with musk and nutty undertones.
Thumbnail of Crimson Ceylon | Organic
This tea has recently changed. The picture is of the tea we had before. This tea has smaller leaves, Updated Picture coming soon..
A blend of Ceylon teas. Grade FBOP.
Thumbnail of Yunnan Gold | Organic
This Yunnan black (Dianhong) tea is a type of Chinese black tea, and is a high end gourmet black tea. When viewed from a distance, the golden tips appear bright orange in colour. The tea liquor is bright red in colour and exhibits a gentle aroma and a sweet taste.

The main difference between Dianhong and other Chinese black teas is the amount of fine leaf buds, or "golden tips," present in the dried tea.

Thumbnail of Assam CTC | Organic
Crush, Tear, and Curl is a method of processing black tea. However instead of the leaves being rolled at a final stage (as a orthodox Assam is), they are passed through a series of cylindrical rollers with hundreds of small sharp "teeth" that crush, tear, and curl the tea. This process removes many of the more tannic parts of the plant, and therefore is great for boiling in water or milk for making chai.
Thumbnail of New Mexico Breakfast Blend | Organic
This blend of pure black tea resonates with the waters of the land and says, "Good Morning!" in a cup. Or "Hello Evening! We're going to be working late together," for those days you just need to hustle. Blended specifically to work well with New Mexico tap water, but is also a beautifully blended breakfast tea with any water. Flavor notes are subtle and sweet, and still come through with subsequent steepings. Enjoy with milk and cream or chilled as an iced tea.
Thumbnail of Vietnam Black | Organic
A relative new comer to the international tea world, Vietnam Black holds up to its name brewing up as a deep, dark mahogany color and bold and robust on the palate. Flavor profile is woodsy with lingering malty qualities and a sweet, smooth finish. A solid, black tea that is quite enjoyable on its own but takes milk and sugar quite well. This tea may give Assam tea new competition for space on your counter!
Thumbnail of Nilgiri Indigo | Organic
Nilgiri tea is a dark, intensely aromatic and flavorful tea grown in the southern portion of the Western Ghats mountains of Southern India.
Thumbnail of Decaf Breakfast | Organic
Black tea from India, decaffeinated using a superior CO-2 process. Note that using more leaves per cup is a common approach when brewing decaffeinated teas, as they do brew a little lighter.
Thumbnail of Nilgiri Iced Tea Blend
This tea is specially blended to make great iced tea. It is rich and smooth while not becoming cloudy when chilling.
Thumbnail of Golden Assam
Assam black tea from the Harmutty Estate, graded as STGFOP-S, represents an exceptional tea with a rich, malty flavor, abundant golden tips, and larger, elegant leaves.
$4.50 Golden Assam
Thumbnail of Jinggu Old Tree Yunnan
ETA: late November/early December

Excellent fullness with subtle China sweetness.

Thumbnail of Sweet Souchong | Organic
This Sweet Souchong is a sweeter, less smokey version of our traditional lapsang souchong, a black tea originally from the Mount Wuyi area in the Fujian province of China. The tea leaves have been withered over pine or cedar fires, pan-fired, rolled and oxidized before being fully dried in bamboo baskets over burning pine. It is a great introduction to smoked teas without being overwhelmed by campfire taste.
Thumbnail of Keemun Mao Feng Imperial
Thumbnail of Tanzania Black | Organic
The soil conditions and altitude in the Usambara Mountain estate combine to give this Assamese varietal distinctive fruit notes in compliment to the traditional malted flavor profile.
Thumbnail of Decaf Irish Breakfast
This beautiful decaffeinated black offers a true malty flavor, with brassy highlights. Brews thick and full-bodied in the preference and style of Ireland. Grown in rich volcanic soil in the high-altitude of Nandi Hills in Kenya. Certified by Ethical Tea Partnerships.

Note that using a more leaves per cup is a common approach when brewing decaffeinated teas, as they do brew a little lighter.

Thumbnail of Decaf English Breakfast
For a decaf, this cup is decidedly self-assured with floral notes, medium body, balanced astringency, and a long finish. Enjoy as is, hot or iced, or compliment with milk.

Note that using a more leaves per cup is a common approach when brewing decaffeinated teas, as they do brew a little lighter.

Thumbnail of Yunnan Black Snail
A bold-leaf Yunnan varietal with smooth cocoa notes and hints of plum and spice. The dry leaves are tightly rolled into a spiral snail shape, dark in color, with golden tip accents. Named for the twisted shape of the finished leaves - fancifully reminiscent of snail shells. The brew is moderately hearty in a longer infusion or can be reinfused about three times with briefer steeps.
Thumbnail of Wakoucha Japanese Black | Organic
Organic Wakoucha is a stunning demonstration of rare Japanese black teas. It has a clean amber red hue when brewed, and the aroma is malty-sweet and floral. It has a prominent juicy sweetness with notes of chrysanthemum and clove and leaves a lingering honeyed floral finish.
Thumbnail of Nepali Noir | Organic
This premium black tea produced at Kanchanjangha Tea Estate has a distinct brisk flavor, with a malty body and notes of raisins and dark chocolate. Grown in the Himalayas, the aromas of fresh fruit and flowers with hints of caramel are enhanced by the high-elevation growing conditions.

Thumbnail of Assam Broken Leaf | Organic
Broken-leaf Assam teas tend to have a full body and brew quickly, therefore are excellent with milk and sugar. This tea makes a good every day tea because it is inexpensive, and yet still flavorful.
Thumbnail of Darjeeling Crescendo | Organic
Made in the late summer months from July to September when the estate is in full production with perfect weather conditions. This particular harvest tastes as fresh as the forest floor after a refreshing rainstorm. Fair warning, this tea can have a bit of a bite if steeped longer than five minutes but pleasant when cooled! The flavour can also be complimented with a dash of milk or sugar unlike Darjeeling Teas from most other seasons which are best enjoyed pure.
Thumbnail of First Flush Darjeeling - Moonshine
First Flush means that this tea was picked in March. It has a light vegetal taste that all first flush Darjeelings share. A tea for all occasions, though typically enjoyed without cream or sugar.
Thumbnail of Wild Thai Black | Organic
Excellent fullness with subtle Thai sweetness.
Thumbnail of Decaf Ceylon
Courtlodge is a highly regarded Ceylon estate, and this Co2 decaffeinated Flowery Pekoe black tea retains its distinction and quality. Lovely alone, hot or iced, or with cream/sugar to taste.
$4.50 Decaf Ceylon
Thumbnail of Kenyan Purple Leaf Tea
Thumbnail of Sourenee Estate | 3rd Flush Darjeeling - Organic
Floral aromatics with bright pepper and alpine notes and deep undertones of nuts, musk and malt.
Thumbnail of Black Fusion | Organic
Plucked in the early summer months of May and June, this stylishly rolled leaf is made from select shoots that draw their succulence from the late spring showers. The cup is clear amber, yet full bodied with an excellent flowery nose. The flavor of the tea is mature in comparison to the First Flush. In taste it has a complex layer of maltiness with musk and nutty undertones.
Thumbnail of Okayti Estate | 1st Flush Darjeeling - Organic
The newest spring growth is reserved for first-pick Darjeeling. The gorgeous full leaves from Okayti Estate are a perfect example of first-flush: a deep flavor of muscatel with floral high notes and a crisp mineral finish.
Thumbnail of Giddapahar Estate | 2nd Flush Darjeeling
A rich, more mature flavor begins to develop in Darjeeling teas as the growing season progresses. Alpine briskness gives way to smooth and complex notes of nuts and malt, while the wonderful floral bouquet that is quintessential to Darjeeling remains.
Thumbnail of Makaibari Estate | 4th Flush Darjeeling - Organic
Made in the late summer months from July to September when the estate is in full production with perfect weather conditions. This particular harvest tastes as fresh as the forest floor after a refreshing rainstorm. Fair warning, this tea can have a bit of a bite if steeped longer than five minutes but pleasant when cooled! The flavour can also be complimented with a dash of milk or sugar unlike Darjeeling Teas from most other seasons which are best enjoyed pure.