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Green tea is a "true" tea (i.e., Camellia sinensis) that has undergone minimal oxidation during processing. Green tea is popular in China, Taiwan, Hong Kong, Japan, Korea, and the Middle East. Recently it has become more widespread in the West as its virtues are being discovered. Green tea is so ubiquitous in Japan that it is more commonly known as "tea" (ocha) and even "Japanese tea" (nihoncha).

Brewing Instructions:

Generally, 1 teaspoon of tea per 6 ounces of water should be used. If the quality of the Green tea is unknown then it should be prepared with 180F water (not boiling) and steeped 2 to 3 minutes. However some finer qualities of tea require cooler water, and less brewing time. Your specific tea should come with instructions.

History:

There is archeological evidence that suggests that tea has been consumed for almost 5000 years, with India and China being two of the first countries to cultivate it. Green tea has been used as traditional medicine in areas such as India, China, Japan and Thailand to help everything from controlling bleeding and helping heal wounds to regulating body temperature, blood sugar and promoting digestion.

Health Benefits:

  1. A 2006 study published in the September 13 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association concluded "Green tea consumption is associated with reduced mortality due to all causes and due to cardiovascular disease but not with reduced mortality due to cancer." The study, conducted by the Tohoku University School of Public Policy in Japan, followed 40,530 Japanese adults, ages 40-79, with no history of stroke, coronary heart disease, or cancer at baseline beginning in 1994. The study followed all participants for up to 11 years for death from all causes and for up to 7 years for death from a specific cause. Participants who consumed 5 or more cups of tea per day had a 16 percent lower risk of all-cause mortality and a 26 percent lower risk of cardiovascular disease than participants who consumed less than one cup of tea per day. The study also states, "If green tea does protect humans against CVD or cancer, it is expected that consumption of this beverage would substantially contribute to the prolonging of life expectancy, given that CVD and cancer are the two leading causes of death worldwide."
  2. A study published in the February 2006 edition of the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition concluded "A higher consumption of green tea is associated with a lower prevalence of cognitive impairment in humans." In May 2006, researchers at the Yale School of Medicine weighed in on the issue with a review article that looked at more than 100 studies on the health benefits of green tea. They pointed to what they called an "Asian paradox," which refers to lower rates of heart disease and cancer in Asia despite high rates of cigarette smoking. They theorized that the 1.2 liters of green tea that is consumed by many Asians each day provide high levels of polyphenols and other antioxidants. These compounds may work in several ways to improve cardiovascular health, including preventing blood platelets from sticking together and improving cholesterol levels, said the researchers, whose study appeared in the May issue of the Journal of the American College of Surgeons. Specifically, green tea may prevent the oxidation of LDL cholesterol (the "bad" type), which, in turn, can reduce the buildup of plaque in arteries, the researchers wrote.
  3. A study published in the August 22, 2006 edition of Biological Psychology looked at the modification of the stress response via L-Theanine, a chemical found in green tea. It "suggested that the oral intake of L-Theanine could cause anti-stress effects via the inhibition of cortical neuron excitation." In a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial done by Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee, 240 adults were given either theaflavin-enriched green tea extract in form of 375mg capsule daily or a placebo. After 12 weeks, patients in the tea extract group had significantly less low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) and total cholesterol (16.4% and 11.3% lower than baseline, than the placebo group. The author concluded that theaflavin-enriched green tea extract can be used together with other dietary approaches to reduce LDL-C.
  4. A study published in the January, 2005 edition of the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition concluded "Daily consumption of tea containing 690 mg catechins for 12 wk reduced body fat, which suggests that the ingestion of catechins might be useful in the prevention and improvement of lifestyle-related diseases, mainly obesity." Antioxidants in green tea may prevent and reduce the severity of rheumatoid arthritis, according to a CWRU's School of Medicine study published in the April 13 2005 issue of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. The study examined the effects of green tea polyphenols on collagen-induced arthritis in mice, which is similar to rheumatoid arthritis in humans. In each of three different study groups, the mice given the green tea polyphenols were significantly less likely to develop arthritis. Of the 18 mice that received the green tea, only eight (44 percent) developed arthritis. Among the 18 mice that did not receive the green tea, all but one (94 percent) developed arthritis. In addition, researchers noted that the eight arthritic mice that received the green tea polyphenols developed less severe forms of arthritis.
  5. A German study found that an extract of green tea and hot water (filtered), applied externally to the skin for 10 minutes, three times a day could help people with skin damaged from radiation therapy (after 16-22 days).
  6. A study published in the December 1999 American Journal of Clinical Nutrition found that "Green tea has thermogenic properties and promotes fat oxidation beyond that explained by its caffeine content per se. The green tea extract may play a role in the control of body composition via sympathetic activation of thermogenesis, fat oxidation, or both.
  7. A study in the August 2003 issue of a new potential application of Cellular and Molecular Life Sciences found that "a new potential application of ()-epigallocatechin-3-gallate [a component of green tea] in prevention or treatment of inflammatory processes is suggested"
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Thumbnail of Lavender Lemon Green
A robust blend of tart lemon with the sweetness of green tea makes this tea excellent iced or hot. The robust flavor of the tea is produced from the rolling of the leaves which breaks down the leaves cells, bring the flavor to the surface. Combine this with the high acidity of the lemon makes this tea great for recharging your batteries in the afternoon or to start one's engine in the morning.
Thumbnail of Biscochito
All the flavors of a biscochito cookie in a cup - and none of the calories! A staple of the New Mexican holiday season, the biscochito is a flat, crumbly, butter-based cookie livened up with anise seed and cinnamon for a warming bite.
$3.75 Biscochito
Thumbnail of Jade Pearl
This tea may look like our Bi Luo Chun but don't let that fool you. This tea not only smells delicious, it brews into a beautiful cup of pure, Chinese green tea with a medium to light body, slight nutty quality and a smooth finish. As this tea cools, more of the vegetable notes come forward.
$4.00 Jade Pearl
Thumbnail of Ceremonial Matcha | Organic
Ceremonial Matcha is made from the most tender, hand-picked young leaves of the Saemidori cultivar, possessing a smooth and savory flavor with a sweeter aroma. Ceremonial Matcha is suitable for serving in Japanese tea ceremony, welcoming esteemed guests, or indulging in the finest of green teas during times of relaxation.
Thumbnail of Uji Kyoto Matcha
Matcha is powdered green tea, and has been used in the Japanese tea ceremony for centuries and as such is normally associated with the beautifully complex, and rigid procedure.

This is the first level of ceremonial grade matcha and is the overall middle grade matcha we carry.

Thumbnail of Wild Thai Green | Organic
Wild Thai Green is an amazingly refreshing and energetic drum-roasted green tea harvested from the antique Assamica gardens of northern Thailand. The elder tea trees growing in this remote micro-climate offer a unique aromatic complexity that reminds tea tasters of the higher grades of sun-dried Saiquing teas from Yunnan.
Thumbnail of Mao Jian Green | Organic
The tea plants are grown high in the mountains in Hunan, China. For two hundred days a year the plants are shrouded in mountain mist. The tea leaves can be steeped hot or cold, producing a rich green tea flavor with smooth after taste.

The shape and taste of this brewed tea will change with each year's harvest. We recommend that if you have not tried this tea in several months since last ordering, it is best to re-order a smaller amount to confirm that the latest batch is to your taste.

Thumbnail of Sweet Surrender
A unique blend of floral and fruity teas that yields smooth memories of summer garden parties. Naturally sweetened with stevia so there is not need to add any extra sugar.
Thumbnail of Hibiscus Matcha | Organic

Energize your life with the combination of organic hibiscus flower powder and organic matcha in one delicious drink. This organic matcha is full of vitamins, caffeine, minerals, fiber, and catechins such as EGCG, and by using real hibiscus flowers in the mix you don’t just get the flavor of hibiscus, but also all the Vitamin C and other components of hibiscus as well.

Thumbnail of Long Island Strawberry | Organic
Sweet, summer strawberries and papaya pieces balanced with the fresh tasting Chinese green tea make this an ideal tea to soothe away winter blues or chilled for a refreshing summer drink.
Thumbnail of Zen-ish | Organic
Imagine the brightness of sun-kissed lemon citrus, chilled against cooling mint and mild green tea, and you have a delicious afternoon treat! This low caffeine tea is perfect hot or cold and any time of day.
Thumbnail of Vanilla Green
The punchy quality of the rolled Sri Lankan green tea is significantly reduced with the delicious vanilla flavor. The resulting cup is a like a warm hug on a cold day; mellow and sweet and just the thing to disappear from the world!
Thumbnail of Pomegranate Hibiscus Green
Hibiscus and pomegranate were made for each other! Tart berry taste with floral highlights yields a cleansing and highly refreshing cup. Enjoy chilled as a great iced tea!
Thumbnail of Bancha
Compared to Sencha, Bancha has a more robust flavor and vivid yellow color. Additionally, leaves harvested in late summer receive more sunlight and thus contain more Catechin, which has a high antioxidant effect. Due to the second harvest quality of the leaves, the resulting tea is considered more of an affordable everyday tea in Japan that is enjoyed by young and old alike.
$3.50 Bancha
Thumbnail of Silver Sencha
This is a blend of white tea buds from China and sencha from Japan. These types of teas are not often blended given the historical context, and flavor profiles. However we have found them to be wonderful together!
Thumbnail of Raspberry Matcha
Matcha, the focal point of the Japanese Tea Ceremony, is a fine powder made by grinding green tea leaves. Only the finest, young, shade-grown gyokuro tea leaves are used to create matcha. The leaves are plucked and laid out flat to dry. Veins are removed and the leaves, now called tencha, are carefully ground in granite mills until they become the precious powder.

Easy preparation is achieved by placing 1/2 teaspoon of matcha per cup (or to taste) in a cup, adding a few drops of hot water (160-180F) and stirring with a spoon until a paste forms. Add the rest of the water and stir.

Thumbnail of Peach Matcha
Matcha, the focal point of the Japanese Tea Ceremony, is a fine powder made by grinding green tea leaves. Only the finest, young, shade-grown gyokuro tea leaves are used to create matcha. The leaves are plucked and laid out flat to dry. Veins are removed and the leaves, now called tencha, are carefully ground in granite mills until they become the precious powder.

Easy preparation is achieved by placing 1/2 teaspoon of matcha per cup (or to taste) in a cup, adding a few drops of hot water (160-180F) and stirring with a spoon until a paste forms. Add the rest of the water and stir.

$9.75 Peach Matcha
Thumbnail of Sunday Symphony - Yellow Tea
Ready to unwind from a hectic week by enjoying the classics? This tea will put you in the mood being a light brew with nutty, floral undertones and finishing with a delicate fruit touch that is sure to please everyone. Which composer or musician do you hear in this cup?
Thumbnail of Genmai Cha
Blend of tea leaves and roasted rice. The nutty and bright flavor of this tea makes it an American favorite.
$3.75 Genmai Cha
Thumbnail of Praha Cassis
This is a smooth, lightly grassy, green tea with the natural flavoring of black currants, a favorite amongst the residents of Prague, or Praha in its native Czech. The blend was created to mimic the taste of creme de cassis - a sweet, dark red liqueur made from blackcurrants - but with all the benefits of enjoying a cup of green tea.
$3.25 Praha Cassis
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