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Pure Herbs and Spices

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Thumbnail of Navajo Wild Tea | Cota

Cota is also known as: Indian tea, Hopi Tea, Navajo Tea, Zuni Tea, Colorado Greenthread. Our cota is wild crafted from Northern New Mexico and is used to relieve stomachaches and other digestive ailments. When dried in the sun, cota appears bright green; when dried in doors, as is done during the monsoon season, cota appears dark, as though it was roasted.

Thumbnail of Nettle Leaf | Organic
Thumbnail of Nutmeg | Organic
Thumbnail of Orange Peel | Organic
This delightful herbal can be steeped by itself, or can be added to your favorite cup of morning tea.
Thumbnail of Parsley Flakes | Organic
Thumbnail of Parsley Root | Organic
Parsley root, which is also called Petroselinum crispum, is high in vitamins A and C and contains iron, iodine and copper.
Thumbnail of Passion Flower | Organic
Thumbnail of Peppermint | Organic
As a hot tea it is cool and refreshing, as an iced tea the menthol content produces a pleasantly chilling taste sensation.

Additionally, it has been reported and written that peppermint sweetens the breath and calms the digestive system, plus it helps heartburn, stomach ache and nausea. An interesting and tingling way to use peppermint is to place a handful of peppermint leaves in your bath water which will lower your body temperature - perfect for cooling fevered skin or after working on a hot summer's day.

Thumbnail of Rama (Green Leaf) Tulsi | Organic
Fresh, mellow flavor this green leaf tulsi has a strong taste of cloves and earthy undertones.
Thumbnail of Raw Chicory Root | Organic
Chicory root does not contain caffeine, although one example of chicory's use as a coffee substitute is found in New Orleans. Historically, when coffee trade was blocked in the harbor, local New Orleanlians began to use chicory instead. Today, chicory remains popular in New Orleans, and 'New Orleans Coffee' typically refers to chicory coffee often blending coffee with up to 30% chicory root.
Thumbnail of Roasted Chicory Root Granules | Organic
Chicory root does not contain caffeine, although one example of chicory's use as a coffee substitute is found in New Orleans. Historically, when coffee trade was blocked in the harbor, local New Orleanlians began to use chicory instead. Today, chicory remains popular in New Orleans, and 'New Orleans Coffee' typically refers to chicory coffee often blending coffee with up to 30% chicory root.
Thumbnail of Rose Petals | Organic
This delightful herbal can be steeped by itself, or can be added to your favorite cup of morning tea.
Thumbnail of Rosehips | Organic
Thumbnail of Rosemary | Organic
Thumbnail of Sage Leaf | Organic
Thumbnail of Sarsaparilla Root | Organic
Sarsaparilla Root is commonly used as a flavoring for drinks, most notably root beer.
Thumbnail of Scullcap | Organic
Thumbnail of Senna Leaf | Organic
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